Behaviorism, social cognitive theory, and information processing theory all have processes that affect self-regulated learning.

Behaviorism, social cognitive theory, and information processing theory all have processes that affect self-regulated learning. Analyze the various processes within each of these three learning theories from a self-regulation perspective and recommend a strategy to use each theory in a classroom situation to enhance self-regulated learning.

In this unit, you examine the concept of self-regulation as a combination of metacognition and effort. You learn what it takes to be a self-regulated learner.

TOGGLE DRAWERHIDE FULL INTRODUCTION

Metacognition is often simply defined as “thinking about thinking,” but there is really more to it than that. In reality, metacognition is comprised of two related sets of skills:

Understanding what skill a task requires.

Knowing how and when to use those skills.

In this unit, you also discover what it takes to use these higher order thinking skills and how to apply them in the classroom to increase student achievement.

OBJECTIVES

To successfully complete this learning unit, you will be expected to:

Examine the relationships between self-regulation and behaviorism, social cognitive theory, information processing theory, and motivation.

Explain the relationship between self-regulation and metacognition and the role each plays in learning and performance.

Explain the self-regulation processes within behaviorism, social cognitive theory, and information processing theory.

Use your textbook to complete the following:

In Learning Theories: An Educational Perspective, read Chapter 9, “Self-Regulation,” pages 401–443. Self-monitoring, self-instruction, and self-reinforcement are the cornerstones of self-regulation—and goal-setting is important as well.

Use your coursepack to complete the following:

In Handbook of Self-Regulation, read Zimmerman’s 2000 article, “Attaining Self-Regulation: A Social Cognitive Perspective,” pages 13–39. In this article, Zimmerman extends Bandura’s triadic definition of self-regulation and discusses the structure of self-regulatory systems, social and physical environmental contexts, and how to develop self-regulation.

Use the Capella University Library to complete the following:

Read Malpass, O’Neil, and Hocevar’s 1999 article, “Self-Regulation, Goal Orientation, Self-Efficacy, Worry, and High-Stakes Math Achievement for Mathematically Gifted High School Students,” pages 281–288 from Roeper Review, volume 21, issue 4. This article is a publication of Dr. Malpass’s 1994 dissertation. It covers the many constructs listed in the title. The results of this research are recommendations to teachers for increasing student achievement.

Read Kaplan’s 2008 article, “Clarifying Metacognition, Self-regulation, and Self-regulated Learning: What’s the Purpose?” from Educational Psychology Review, volume 20, issue 4, pages 477–484.

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